The Mayor of Bath

Victorian Bath

In 1830 Princess Victoria made her first and last visit to Bath to open the Royal Victoria Park, which was designed by the City Architect, Edward Davis. It was an area containing a wide selection of trees and shrubs from around the world and provided a haven of 56 acres of parkland to escape the bustle of the city centre.

During the mid-1800s the railway began to overtake the canal as the preferred means of moving merchandise. Isambard Kingdom Brunel designed Bath Spa Station as part of the infrastructure of his expanding Great Western Railway.

In the 1890's John Brydon extended the original Guildhall, adding the dome and two baroque wings. The engraving on the north end, which housed the technical school, depicted the subjects taught within. The engraving on the south end, housing the Mayor's Parlour, the council chamber, the civic offices and the courts, depicted civic authority and the judiciary.

Further Reading

Children's Portraits of the Mayor 2011

Pictures of the Mayor by children visiting the Parlour during Heritage Week 2011

Previous copies of Connections

Medieval Bath

Bath became a city of trade and prospered from the woollen industry. It was ideally situated as drovers could bring their sheep in from the edge of the Cotswold Hills, the River Avon powered the mills and proximity to the port of Bristol helped the trader

"Floreat Bathon" May Bath flourish